Verbiest: House and Workshop in a Warehouse

Files: abstract, poster, full paper

Fragments from proceedings (‘artefact submission’)’:

Abstract.

This project addresses the transformation of a large warehouse of about 1000sqm built between 1900 and 1970 in Molenbeek into a single family house and a shared artistic workshop. The project addresses various issues and themes, amongst which the environmental impact of the construction and of the future consumptions. The artefact is not limited to the design outcome but comprises the design process. /…/

Keywords.

Architecture; Transformation; Reuse; Design Process; Sustainability

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The threefold presentation explores a possible medium to create artefacts which somehow can be considered equivalent to the project itself. Through the embodiment of a network of inputs and outputs in a creative act. By enlarging the scope to the entire process and to the stimuli surrounding it. While respecting the subjective nature of such networks. In order to provoke the interpretation of the project by the audience. Resulting in statistic objectivation through the endlessness actualization of graspable combinations.
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Scrutinizing Spatial Potential behind the Representation through Perspective Drawing

File: abstract

Fragments from proceedings (‘artefact submission’)’:

Abstract.

Since its invention in the Renaissance, linear perspective has dominated (architectural) representation and spatial understanding in the West, providing a geometrical tool for a two-dimensional rendering of space. This doctoral design driven research however argues that there is a hidden potential to perspective as we know it and that it could be employed as an actor in the process of (three-dimensional) space-making as well. Furthermore will this generation of new spatialities provoke further reflection on how we look at space.

In a search for revealing the assumed formative features of perspective, this research operates within the Paduan Scrovegni chapel, more particular within the frescoes that are painted on the interior walls by Giotto (c. 1267 – 1337), a Proto- Renaissance painter/architect who is considered as one of the predecessors in the evolution of perspective, hence the pictorial style as we know today1. St. Anne’s house, depicted in The Birth of the Virgin is a first selected piece of architecture to undergo an initial reversal of projection: through performing analogue perspective drawing interventions, we are able to penetrate the picture plane and (re)construct possible versions of the depicted architecture – a transformation from 2D rendition into 3D reconstruction. This new spatiality can subsequently serve as accessible looking machine. The flexibility and instability of this fictive field allow for a context where confusion and ambiguity (characteristic for Proto- Renaissance depictions) are tolerated and, moreover stimulate the emergence of creative insights.

As artefact we would like to present the intermediary output of our dwelling behind the surface: the confrontation with Anne’s house after being subjected to a perspectival disclosure. Central is the drawing showing the house, a peculiar oneroom- building, approached as an autonomous architectural object but at the same time brought into relation with the physical reality of the chapel. Accompanying the drawing, modelling and video work will be included as well, addressing both the 2D gaze and the 3D experience. This mixed media approach has a propelling effect in the empirical research and enhances not only the comprehension of the physical outcome, but also the accessibility of the mental space. The objective is not the reconstruction of Anne’s house as such, but the chances that this fiction enables. For this explorative research is an enquiry into the potentiality of (un)expected spaces beyond the representation and the ensuing knowledge production.

Keywords.

Perspective, analogue drawing, proto-renaissance, design driven research

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PROPOSAL ARTEFACT As artefact we would like to present the intermediary output of our dwelling behind the surface: the confrontation with Anne’s house after being subjected to a perspectival disclosure. Central is (1) the drawing (pencil on tracing paper) that shows the represented house, approached as an autonomous architectural object but at the same time brought into relation with the physical reality of the chapel that incorporates the fresco. The original drawing will be physically presented at the conference. The paper measures 90 by 200 cm and should preferably be laid down. The extra (2) drawings and (3) models that accompany this centerpiece will be displayed in relation to it: placed on the paper, integrated within the surface area, so to form one whole and not to exceed the 90x200cm borders. (If there is possibly an empty wall available next to the table with the drawing, I would maybe opt to project the video of the model as well.) [The work here presented is still in progress, for the exploration within this fresco has not yet been concluded.]